COUN 500 Counseling Advisement
COUN 500 Counseling Advisement must be taken each semester a student is enrolled in the School of Counseling. This courses covers the initial orientation which is scheduled during the first days of fall and spring semesters, subsequent advisement course content is provided. Students are required to visit the online course website at least once a week.  Various brief meetings may be scheduled during the student’s course of study. This course introduces new students to the knowledge, skills, and characteristics related to being successful in the program. Students gain an understanding of the conceptual framework that guides the program and review important elements of the School of Counseling program handbook.  Course evaluations and student Professional Performance Reviews are posted in this course for students to fill out each semester.  (0 credit hrs) (Pass/Fail)

COUN 510 Foundations and Ethics of Clinical Mental Health Counseling
COUN 510 Foundations and Ethics of Clinical Mental Health Counseling introduces students to the profession of clinical mental health counseling, including professional roles, identity and functions, the history and philosophy of the profession, scope of practice, ethical and professional practice issues, credentialing, and the role of professional associations in students’ professional development. Students will explore the multiple functions of counselors across specialty areas and the relationships with integrated behavioral healthcare systems. They will also consider the importance of advocacy for mental health service needs across diverse populations. Students will begin to explore and interpret situations based on federal laws, state regulations, and professional guidelines and best practices. The course ends with a 4 day residency to assess and deepen students’ understanding and practice of these foundational concepts in professional counseling.  (3 credit hrs)

COUN 520 Theories and Models of Counseling and Personality
COUN 520 Theories and Models of Counseling and Personality introduces students to the primary theoretical models of personality theory and counseling practice, including psychodynamic, affective, cognitive behavioral, humanistic, interpersonal, multicultural, integrative, and systems theory. A focus on evidence-based practices that incorporate diversity issues with population-specific approaches is a significant feature of this course. Emphasis is on the importance of students recognizing belief systems that accurately reflect their own personal style and to recognize strategies and approaches likely to be most successful with a particular client population. Students will utilize case conceptualization to demonstrate their understanding of theoretical foundations as the basis of clinical practice and to evaluate and assess clinical situations for implementation of therapeutic interventions that are  appropriate with diverse individuals, groups, and families. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 530 Human Growth and Development across the Lifespan
COUN 530 Human Growth and Development across the Lifespan introduces students to the biological, neurological, physiological, cognitive, social, emotional, religious / spiritual and cultural domains set forth by the major theories of human growth and development. Developmental theories such as learning and personality are addressed, as well as those that are related to individuals, families, the larger social context, and environment. Students will begin to conceptualize the needs of their clients within a developmentally appropriate framework and to develop culturally sensitive and relevant strategies for promoting resilience and optimum development, wellness, and flourishing across the lifespan. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 540 Career Development
COUN 540 Career Development introduces students to vocational theory and career counseling. Students explore the historical foundations of vocational theory and are assessed on understanding strategies for applying career, avocational, educational, occupational, and labor market information in client evaluation and assessment of career planning and decision making. Vocational and career counseling is examined as an integral component of the overall assessment and treatment of clients representing diverse populations found within the scope of community, mental health, and marriage and family counseling. Students demonstrate ethical and culturally relevant counseling competencies necessary in the provision of career and vocational counseling to diverse clients across the lifespan. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 550 Research and Program Evaluation
COUN 550 Research and Program Evaluation introduces students to basic research methods and designs, reliability and validity of research, evidence based research, and critical evaluation of published research. Students will be introduced to scales of measurement, descriptive statistics, and basic univariate inferential statistics commonly used in counseling research and program evaluation. Students will demonstrate understanding of using ethical and culturally relevant strategies for conducting, interpreting, and reporting research study results and identify evidence-based counseling practices as well as strategies for developing and using outcomes measures in counseling programs. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 560 Social and Cultural Diversity
COUN 560 Social and Cultural Diversity introduces students to profession accepted counseling techniques to address the diverse, cultural context of individuals and their  relationships between and within groups, as well as issues and trends in a diverse society. The counselor’s role in social justice and client advocacy are investigated with a focus on heritage, attitudes, beliefs, understandings, and acculturative experiences. Comprehensive, advanced knowledge of diversity factors that include age, ethnicity, nationality, spirituality, religious preferences, gender, sexual orientation, mental and physical characteristics, and socioeconomic status are assessed. Students will assess their own global orientation to different individual and familial worldviews through this study of history and development of cultural values and behaviors and demonstrate their knowledge of effective counselor multicultural assessment, diagnoses, and interventions. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 570 Marriage and Family Systems Theory
COUN 570 Marriage and Family Systems Theory  introduces students to the historical and theoretical bases for the practice of marriage, couple, and family counseling. Special attention is given to an overview of foundational systems-oriented theories (Bowenian, Strategic, Structural, etc.), and the impact of issues such as gender, culture, and ethnicity on the family system. Students will examine their own assumptions about families and begin to develop increased congruence between their assumptions, philosophical/theological presuppositions, and the various theoretical perspectives on family development, functioning, interaction and intervention. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 580 Counseling Skills and Helping Relationships
COUN 580 Counseling Skills and Helping Relationships introduces foundational helping skills essential to conducting effective counseling. Students focus on developing clinical mental health counseling skills, establishing rapport and building therapeutic relationships while applying ethical and legal standards of practice.  Emphasis is on how the person of the counselor impacts the therapeutic alliance with clients along with what the counselor does in the session to help facilitate client change. This course is taught from a relationship-centered, strengths-based model utilizing feedback. Students will participate in mock counseling sessions with peers in order to practice and demonstrate basic counseling skills and techniques. The course ends with a 4 day residency to assess and deepen students counseling skills. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 600 Developmental Psychopathology — Risk and Resilience
COUN 600 Developmental Psychopathology — Risk and Resilience introduces students to the concept of developmental psychopathology along the continuum of stress, distress, and disorder with focus on behavioral, experiential, and relational manifestations of mental health. This course reinforces the comparative distinctions between normative and psychopathological developmental pathways from infancy through adolescence. The current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) is introduced as a method for categorizing symptoms and for classifying psychopathology as necessary for diagnoses, conceptualization, and treatment of mental disorders. A variety of perspectives on psychopathology are presented to form an integrative and systemic context for diagnostic considerations. Emphasis is placed on understanding cultural, biological, social, and spiritual / religious domains, along with the factors of risk and human resilience in the development of psychiatric disorders. Students will be able to develop an understanding of clients through this comprehensive model of psychopathology. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 610 Group Counseling and Group Work
COUN 610 Group Counseling and Group Work introduces students to a range of theoretical and experiential group counseling structures and strategies involving group development, group processes, and group dynamics in clinical settings. An in-depth exploration is focused on group formation including recruiting, screening and selecting group members.  A focus on group developmental theories, group member roles and behaviors, leadership styles, types of groups and professional standards for group leaders prepares students for advanced work in group counseling interventions. Students are required to engage in diverse, culturally relevant direct group experiences defined within a small group activity approved by the instructor of the course within the School of Counseling guidelines, and to document at least 10 clock hours of group work during this course. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 620 Assessment and Testing across the Lifespan
COUN 620 Assessment and Testing across the Lifespan reinforces student understanding of intellectual, academic achievement, personality, and psychopathology tests and other appraisal methods used in the counseling field for individuals, couples and families. Focus will be given to assessment of different dimensions of functioning- behavioral, emotional, psychological, and personality among children, adolescents, adults, couples, and family dynamics. Students will develop advanced skills in the selection, administration, and interpretation of assessment tools used to evaluate client issues and functioning for individuals, couples and families. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 630 Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Planning
COUN 630 Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Planning reinforces assessment and  diagnostic skills necessary for the diagnoses of psychopathology with a focus on differential diagnosis, case conceptualization, client-engaged treatment planning, and clinical mental health intervention. Students synthesize understanding and critical thinking skills required to clinically assess, diagnose and treat atypical symptoms, multiple diagnoses, and co-occurring criteria.  Students will conduct in-depth exploration of the legal and ethical use of appropriate surveys, instruments and tests accepted in the industry when rendering diagnoses aligned with current DSM criteria. Students will demonstrate the knowledge and ability  to assess and develop working diagnoses and treatment plans including for behaviors of potential harm to self and others. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 640 Crisis & Trauma — Prevention and Treatment
COUN 640 Crisis & Trauma — Prevention and Treatment introduces students to the foundations, contextual dimensions, and basic knowledge and skills to function in specialized settings of agency, community and emergency environments. Emphasis will be placed on providing intervention in clinical, disaster, crisis, and traumatic situations, including emergencies in which triage, intervention, support, referral and advocacy are required. Specialized areas will include counselor self-care; wellness and prevention; suicide de-escalation, crisis incident stress management, psychological first aid, other trauma informed interventions and treatment, and emergency management response teams. Attention is given to the role that spirituality and religion play in helping or hindering persons in crisis. Students will be able to utilize and assess intervention strategies in crisis and trauma situations. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 650 Addictions Counseling
COUN 650 Addictions Counseling introduces students to an overview of the challenges associated with addiction and its widespread impact on individuals, families and communities. This course is designed to address the various dynamics, models, etiologies, diagnoses, psychopathologies, and recovery strategies related to addiction counseling. Students will identify the empirically supported assessment and treatment interventions shown to be effective for individuals, families, groups, and diverse populations, as well as be familiar with the emerging issues in the field based upon current research to include exploration of co-occurring and trauma-related disorders. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 660 Child and Adolescent Counseling
COUN 660 Child and Adolescent Counseling introduces students with the basic principles of counseling children and adolescents within the context of family, school, and socio-cultural and religious systems. The emphasis is on helping students develop their own individual style in forming therapeutic relationships with children and adolescents, and in assessing students’ selection and use of evidence-based therapeutic skills and techniques, including therapeutic mediums such as toys, audio/visual aids, games, cognitive treatment, and behavioral programs. A special focus is given to parent training and parents as co-therapists. Legal and ethical issues specific to working with children are addressed. Students will acquire introductory knowledge of different therapy models, assessments for counseling, and skills related to working with children and adolescents. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 670 Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling
COUN 670 Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling introduces models and methods of intervention with couples and families to develop effective professional skills for working with couples and families.  Techniques, assessments, interventions, and strategies will be researched, discussed, and practiced to develop preventive approaches as well as approaches to facilitate optimal functioning in the midst of various challenges in marriage, couple, and family life (e.g., step family issues, divorce/remarriage, extramarital affairs, etc.).  A special emphasis will be placed on families and change, coping with stressful events and transitions in family life. Students will acquire introductory knowledge of relationship dynamics, assessment, and skills related to working with couples and families. (3 credit hrs)

COUN 690 Counseling Practicum/Advanced Clinical Intervention Skills
COUN 690 Counseling Practicum/Advanced Clinical Intervention Skills provides students with an initial experience in delivering counseling services to diverse individuals, couples, families, and groups. This experience requires a minimum of 100 hours on site in a clinical placement setting, 40 of which must be direct service, face-to-face with clients conducting intake / assessments, treatment planning, and interventions. Students will participate in individual and group supervision in which they will review their counseling sessions for discussion and evaluation. Student performance is monitored throughout the course and includes a formal evaluation at the middle and end of the course. Students will be able to demonstrate the necessary clinical and ethical competencies in the areas of diagnostic interviewing and assessment, case conceptualization, diverse / cultural contextualization, goal setting, treatment planning, counseling intervention, and case management. The course begins with a 4 day residency to assess and deepen students understanding and practice of the needed professionalism and clinical skills for a counseling practicum. (3 credit hrs)  (Pass/Fail)

COUN 691 & COUN 692 Counseling Internship 1 & 2
COUN 691 & COUN 692 Counseling Internship 1 & 2 provide students with advanced experiences in delivering counseling services to diverse individuals, couples, families, and groups. This is a two semester experience that requires a minimum of 600 hours on site, 240 of which must be direct service, face-to-face with clients conducting intake / assessments, differential diagnoses, treatment planning, and interventions. Students will participate in individual and group supervision in which they will review their counseling sessions for discussion and evaluation. Student performance is monitored throughout the course and includes a formal evaluation at the middle and end of each of the internship courses to assess mastery of essential counseling techniques, evidence-based practice, and advanced clinical skills. Students will be able to demonstrate advanced clinical and ethical competencies in the areas of diagnostic interviewing, case conceptualization, diverse cultural contextualization, client-engaged goal setting, treatment planning, counseling intervention, and case management. (3 credit hrs per course) (Pass/Fail)

COUN 693 Counseling Internship 3
COUN 693 Counseling Internship 3 is designed for students who are currently seeing clients and have not completed their required supervised internship hours and/or are currently not enrolled in any regular internship course. This course provide students with advanced experiences in delivering counseling services to diverse individuals, couples, families, and groups. This course continues the internship experience that requires a minimum of 600 hours on site, 240 of which must be direct service, face-to-face with clients conducting intake / assessments, differential diagnoses, treatment planning, and interventions. Students will participate in individual and group supervision in which they will review their counseling sessions for discussion and evaluation. Student performance is monitored throughout the course and includes a formal evaluation at the middle and end of each of the internship courses to assess mastery of essential counseling techniques, evidence-based practice, and advanced clinical skills. Students will be able to demonstrate advanced clinical and ethical competencies in the areas of diagnostic interviewing, case conceptualization, diverse cultural contextualization, client-engaged goal setting, treatment planning, counseling intervention, and case management.  This course may be repeated as needed and is offered based on student need.  Internship site supervision and the classroom component are required until internship hour requirements are met and the internship contract is fulfilled. (1-3 credit hours based on projected need for student) (Pass/Fail)

PHT 513 The Flourishing Person
PHT 510 Vocations and Virtues: The Flourishing Person introduces students to a Catholic-Christian integrative vision of personal and interpersonal flourishing through vocations and the virtues and its application to counseling.  This course explores how the vision of human flourishing that one adopts is crucial for understanding and promoting human development and addressing human problems. The course addresses the theory and implications of: the human person’s dignity in the light of being created in the image of God as male and female; the effects of sin and redeeming grace; a vocation and virtue approach; a personalist and natural law approach; the person as a spiritual unity of body and soul that is relational, emotional, rational, and free. Students will learn how to take a holistic and transformative approach, which integrates Biblical/theological, philosophical, and bio-psycho-social-cultural perspectives into a global understanding of the human person and flourishing. Students will develop the mindset and competencies needed to understand and assess the integrative potential of different models of the person. (3 credit hrs)

PHT 523 Moral Character and Spiritual Flourishing
PHT 520 Moral Character and Spiritual Flourishing introduces students to a Catholic-Christian vision of personal and interpersonal flourishing in terms of vocations and virtues, and human and spiritual resources. The importance of a multidimensional model of vocation and virtue for everyday life and counseling will be explored. Students will examine how Catholic-Christian practices can be sources of relationship, support, growth, healing, and flourishing. Students will develop skills for achieving personal growth and freedom through building up their practical reasoning, moral character, and spiritual life of faith, hope, and charity, which have an impact on everyday life, mental health counseling, and vocational commitments. Students will reinforce their moral  and spiritual formation, through personal reflections, and a cohort community of spiritual practice and interaction. (3 credit hrs)

PHT 533 Flourishing in Relationships
PHT 530 Flourishing in Relationships introduces students to the nature and discernment of vocational states of being single, married, ordained, or religious (consecrated).  Emphasis is placed on courtship and on marriage, which is understood as a natural and divine institution that serves to support and protect individuals, families, and society.  Students will examine the continuity and development of Catholic-Christian teaching on marriage and family in a historical, bio-psycho-social-cultural, philosophical, and theological context. Students will analyze several issues that are especially pertinent to clinical mental health counseling, including not only disorders and difficulties related to singleness, romance, marriage, and family life, but also supporting strengths and practices. (3 credit hrs)

M.S. Psychology – General Program Outcomes

2013-2014 Data is in process and will be published when

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M.S. Clinical Psychology Program Outcomes

2013-2014 Data is in process and will be updated as soon

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Program Outcomes

For individual program outcomes, please follow the below links. M.S.

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MSP Academic Calendar

MSP Academic Calendar 2016 – 2017 Fall 2016 Term #1:

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Faculty Psy.D. Clinical Psychology

Core Program Faculty Core Program Faculty devote at least 50%

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PsyD Professional Development

(in progress)

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