“I wanted to become a psychologist in order to help people break free of the chains of mental illness and experience joy and peace. I consider it a personal mission to help others understand their own intrinsic worth in the face of psychological struggle and doubt.”

Please tell us a little bit about your background.

I earned my B.S. in Psychology from the University of Kentucky (UK) in 2014, with minors in Neuroscience and Business. After entering college, I became intensely interested in psychological processes and the impact of psychological illness on human life. A person’s psychology is a huge part of who they are; it impacts the spiritual realm, relationships, and personal calling and happiness. I wanted to become a psychologist in order to help people break free of the chains of mental illness and experience joy and peace. I consider it a personal mission to help others understand their own intrinsic worth in the face of psychological struggle and doubt.

What attracted you to IPS?

I was ultimately attracted to IPS because the school addresses that and has implemented the integrative model for training that strives to encounter every aspect of a human person (spiritual, physical, vocational, psychological etc). It’s a beautiful model that integrates Catholic truth about God’s love for us and our calling in this world with empirically supported evidenced-based psychological practices. I love it here and I am so thankful for this opportunity.

Coming from a secular undergraduate program, I can personally attest to how different the IPS model is from secular training in psychology. Modern psychology often utilizes a medical model approach, treating clients as patients with diseases and focusing on symptom reduction and returning the client to “health”. Often times, this “health” is simply a return to the same state the client was in before the therapy. The IPS model looks at the person as a creation of God with a purpose in life, a need for relationship, and capacities and strengths that can strengthen them to follow their calling and flourish in life.

How does IPS differ from your previous training?

In my experience, my training at UK and IPS differs drastically in focus, themes, and appreciation for personhood. I loved my time at UK and I learned much about the latest theories and therapeutic models in psychology, but IPS offers an integrated model that allows me to incorporate my faith and calling with the client’s faith and calling into our therapeutic relationship.

What are your plans for the future?

My plans for the future include becoming a licensed therapist. Ideally, I’d like to work with married couples and families, and eventually to open my own private practice.

What advice would you like to pass on to prospective students?

All prospective students: Pray and talk to God about if this is the right place for you because graduate school is incredibly busy and it is hard work. Once you’ve decided to come here, though, trust that God’s got you and wants to help you succeed and flourish. Trust Him and His voice. Peace and joy to you in your decision.

Read More Student Testimonials

David Kovacs, M.S.

“While I immensely enjoyed working at the school, the part I enjoyed the most was when a student would enter my office and talk to me about what was going on in his or her life. I often thought how great it would be if I could work full-time helping others in this capacity.”

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Rebecca Showalter, M.S.

“As an undergrad I quickly became disillusioned because what I was learning in my psychology classes was markedly different than what I was learning about my faith.”

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Serra Ann Boland

“I in them and you in me, that they may be brought to perfection as one, that the world may know that you sent me, and that you loved them even as you loved me…” -John 17:21

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Marie Claire Roderick, M.S.

Pursuing a career in clinical psychology was never in my plan. Throughout my youth, I was highly involved in a number of activities. I was a competitive athlete and dancer, took lessons in piano and art, and did outdoor adventure sports. Although I loved the arts and sports, I was uncertain about developing a career in either field. When applying to college and selecting a major, I was undecided.

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Josh Kalman, M.S.

After taking numerous courses in psychology that treated religion and truth as something that is purely a personal experience, I began to see where the secular schools are lacking. I decided that I wanted to go to a school where religion is not taboo, and where the students and faculty are focused on the whole person.

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Conrad Burbank

Psy.D. student Conrad Burbank draws on his experience as a student-athlete in undergrad to manage the rigors of IPS.

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