Doctoral Program (Psy.D.) in Clinical Psychology

Doctoral study in the helping professions rooted in psychology and the Catholic tradition.

Academics Detail

Psy.D. Course Descriptions

PSY 500 – History and Systems of Psychology

(3 credit hours)

Behaviorism, psychoanalytical theory, and biologically based theories (e.g., cognitive neuroscience) have been offered as coherent accounts of the nature of the human person. All derive support from versions of evolutionary theory. On this account, theories of motivation are of the survivalistic variety, conduct is understood as “adaptive,” and complex social phenomena are reduced to socio-biological processes. This course assesses these empirical and conceptual orientations.

PSY 503 – Personality Theories

(3 credit hours)

Introduces the major theories of personality used in clinical/counseling psychology, including those schools of thought associated with Freud, Object-Relations theory, Erikson, Jung, Adler, Horney, Rogers, Maslow and Cognitive-Behavioral theory. Emphasis is also put on relevant research findings and critical assessment of the validity and usefulness of the different theories.

PSY 504 – Psychological Measurement

(3 credit hours)

This course covers the application of statistical thinking to the measurement of psychological phenomena. It presents statistical concepts basic to psychometrics, as well as familiarity with computer analysis. Classical reliability theory, generalizability theory, item response theory, and Rasch modeling are all examined. Scaling, central tendency, individual differences and correlation, principles of test development and standardization, and the various forms of reliability and validity and the threats posed to them by design and respondent characteristics are addressed. Practical issues in psychometrics are presented.

PSY 507 – Psychopathology

(3 credit hours)

This course provides an overview of the major theories, classification systems, and research in the area of psychopathology. It introduces students to diagnostic nomenclature, emphasizing the development of facility with the DSM-IV classification system. It also examines how spiritual and moral pathology affect the quality of life.

PSY 512 – Law, Ethics and Psychology

(3 credit hours)

This course examines the ethical codes and guidelines developed within the mental health field. Special emphasis is placed on how these ethical guidelines, along with Christian principles, can be applied to the practice of psychology in a manner which holds the well-being of the client as primary. The course also examines professional issues relevant to the practice of psychology.

PSY 516 – Basic Interviewing and Clinical Skills

(3 credit hours)

This course provides an introduction to the art and science of basic clinical skills aimed at forming a comprehensive understanding of the person, with special emphasis on assessing dimensions consistent with a Catholic perspective. Specifically, this course will orient students to general philosophical issues related to clinical interviewing and present critical fundamentals of therapeutic relationship development. Instruction will also address particular challenges presented by high risk clients, the need for mandatory reporting, and interviews with children, adolescents, couples, and culturally diverse populations. The course includes a blend of lecture, skill demonstration, and student practice.

PSY 550 – Helping People Flourish: A Catholic/Christian Approach to Psychology

In this course, students develop the skills required to become successful online learners. Students begin using resources that are present throughout the program, such as the online library, and engaging in exercises in reflection and practical application. They work toward building a foundation for academic and professional success as scholar-practitioners and agents of positive change through their graduate study of psychology. Students are also introduced to the “IPS Model,” which integrates the Catholic/Christian vision of the person with best practices in psychological theory, research, and intervention. This positive model views the person as possessing intrinsic dignity, as free and able to make responsible choices, relational and connected to others and society, and as seeking psychological well-being, moral character, and spiritual growth. Finally students assess the relationship of the program to their personal and professional goals and create a professional development plan which they refine throughout their course of studies. (9 weeks)

PSY 555 – Relationship and Intervention Skills Theory and Application

The focus of this course is on developing the competencies (knowledge, attitudes, and skills) necessary for becoming an effective helping professional. These competency areas include interviewing skills, skills for building and maintaining helping relationships with clients, case conceptualization, treatment planning, case management, and group facilitation skills. Students will also consider interpersonal skills such as de-escalation, negotiation, and crisis intervention. Knowledge of ethical principles and models of decision making, related to the helping professions are covered. Students also learn to identify and consider diversity issues in the context of providing services as a helping professional.

PSY 560 – Human Growth and Development Across the Lifespan

Students in this course explore the biological, psychological, and social factors of human growth and development through the lifespan, including prenatal, childhood, adolescent, adult, and late-adult phases, concluding with issues surrounding aging and end of life. This course focuses on basic processes and theories, and students evaluate the developmental milestones that occur within these phases. Topics covered include the development of emotional, cognitive, interpersonal, and moral life.

PSY 565 – Common Psychological Problems and Their Treatment

Students in this course examine in-depth the current theory and research associated with the diagnosis and treatment of common psychological problems at the individual level (e.g., depression & anxiety) and at the relational level (e.g., marital distress and parenting problems). Students are introduced to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), a classification system for adult and child mental disorders. Emphasis is placed on using the DSM and the IPS Model approaches together for case conceptualization and treatment planning.

PSY 570 – Statistical Analysis for Psychology and the Social Sciences

This course approaches the study of psychological measurement and statistical methods from a practical problem-solving and “intelligent consumer” perspective. Students gain a basic understanding and applied knowledge of statistics so they can select appropriate assessment instruments, evaluate programs and interventions, and understand research study results. Such knowledge is aimed at assisting helping professionals to be more effective in their roles as helper, manager, and leader. An emphasis on actual statistical and methodological problems facilitates understanding of the basic course content.

PSY 575 – Social Psychology and Diversity: Relations among Individuals, Groups and Society

In this course, students use the lens of social psychology and human diversity to examine both social perceptions/thoughts and social behavior—phenomena that pertain to the individual in society. Students explore the topics of forming impressions, stereotyping, social influence, attitude development and change, bias and discrimination, antisocial and pro-social behaviors, affiliation and attraction, and sex role behaviors, and consider how knowledge of these topics can be used to promote positive social change. The course also emphasizes how the various types of diversity impact the helping professional and interventions chosen to assist clients. Areas of diversity include but are not limited to: culture, ethnicity, religion, socioeconomic status, gender, age, and those who are differently enabled.

PSY 580 – Leading People and Programs

This course covers two key areas: (1) being a leader in a service delivery setting and (2) program planning for the helping professions. Students examine the core leadership competencies that helping professionals need to address the challenges they face, and to make a greater difference in the communities they serve. A broad range of skills and approaches are discussed, including inter-program and inter-agency collaboration, and stakeholder communication, as well as the supervision of staff and volunteers. Being an effective leader also requires sound administrative practices such as budgeting. Finally, students learn the framework, theories, and process of program planning, emphasizing models that are widely used in the helping professions. They learn how to assess needs and identify assets, then to design and implement programs that meet these needs.

PSY 585 – Personality, Individual Differences and Intelligence

Students in this course are introduced to the major theories of personality and personality assessment approaches. Students examine research that supports different theories as well as basic concepts and principles from the various schools of thought. Theories include psychoanalytic, evolutionary, biological, behaviorist, learning, social-cognitive, trait, humanistic, and existential, in addition to personality dimensions such as the Big Five. Students consider themes of mutual respect for differences throughout the course. Students also learn to recognize assessment approaches that are based on personality differences.

PSY 590 – Evidence-based Practice and Program Evaluation

This course examines two related competencies for the helping professional: being an evidence-based practitioner and being a critical evaluator of programs and services. In examining these topics, this course focuses on key questions that helping professionals face such as “How do I read current research with a critical eye?” “How do I apply research to my practice?” and “How do I conduct fair, but thorough, evaluations of programs and services in my organization?” Such skills promote more effective and efficient service delivery.

PSY 595 – Capstone: The Transformational Leader in the Helping Professions

IPS graduates have a valuable opportunity to impact their clients and society. In this course, students synthesize their learning across their courses, informed by the Catholic/Christian view of the human person. They address leadership in the helping professions through the completion of a capstone project in which they apply the knowledge and skills gained throughout the program to a real-world problem. In addition, students demonstrate their understanding of the importance of lifelong learning by identifying specific goals for professional involvement and service beyond the completion of their studies at IPS.

PSY 597 – Psychology Overview Seminar I

(1 credit hour)

This weekly seminar is for entering MS students who have little or no prior educational background in psychology. Planned readings will cover abnormal, developmental, experimental, physiological and social, learning and motivation, personality theory, sensory and perception, memory, assessment and treatment.

PSY 598 – Psychology Overview Seminar II

(1 credit hour)

This is a continuation of a weekly seminar for entering MS students who have little or no prior educational background in psychology. Planned readings will cover abnormal, developmental, experimental, physiological and social, learning and motivation, personality theory, sensory and perception, memory, assessment and treatment.

PSY 605 – Developmental Psychology

(3 credit hours)

This course covers the major theoretical systems that seek to explain the development of the human person, and examines them from a variety of perspectives: physical, intellectual, emotional, spiritual and moral. It also considers central aspects of Christian life such as the development of the conscience, the life of virtue, commitment to human relationships and the discernment of one’s vocation.

PSY 608 – Cognitive/Behavioral Assessment

(3 credit hours)

Offers an overview of the major theories of intelligence and develops basic skills in the administration of commonly used standardized test instruments for assessing cognitive ability and achievement in children, adolescents, and adults. Also covers the basics of report writing and ethical issues pertaining to psychological assessment.
(Prerequisites: PSY 504, PSY 516)

PSY 609 – Adult Psychotherapy

(3 credit hours)

The purpose of this course is to identify, develop and practice core clinical skills and tasks in the treatment of adult psychopathology. This includes developing and maintaining therapeutic relationships with clients as well as the application of particular systems of psychotherapy in identifying and effectively working toward therapeutic goals. In addition, students will gain a greater ability to critique secular approaches to psychotherapy in light of a Catholic view of the human person and explore psychotherapeutic approaches informed by this anthropology.
(Prerequisite: PSY 507)

PSY 610 – Child Psychotherapy

(3 credit hours)

Develops an integrated Catholic framework for understanding family life and the role of parents in raising children. Provides training in basic skills for working with children in therapy including play therapy, behavioral techniques, parenting skills training, and family therapy. Also examines ethical and diversity issues related to the practice of child and family therapy.

PSY 611 – Marital Psychotherapy

(3 credit hours)

Develops an integrated Catholic framework for understanding the nature of marriage and marital relationships. Provides training in basic skills used in the assessment and treatment of marital distress. Also examines ethical and diversity issues related to the practice of marital therapy.

PSY 613 – Personality Assessment

(3 credit hours)

This course offers instruction in basic skills in the administration of commonly used personality tests, including both psychometric and projective approaches to personality assessment. It also offers instruction in report writing skills by examining the ways in which the results of cognitive/behavioral assessment and a variety of personality assessment instruments can be integrated.
(Prerequisites: PSY 507, PSY 608)

PSY 690 – Thesis Research

(up to 6 credit hours)

Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Registration for thesis research is required for all Master’s Program in Psychology students. The thesis proposal is developed, submitted for approval, research conducted, and the written thesis submitted for approval by the thesis committee.

PSY 691 – M.S. “Plus Option” Clinical Practicum/Externship I

(3 credit hours)

This course is the first part of a two-part course sequence that also includes PSY 692. During these two courses students are placed in clinical practicum sites where they complete a nine-month practicum that provides for a minimum of 300 hours of supervised clinical practice. Students also attend regularly scheduled case consultation groups in which they discuss clinical practice from an integrated Catholic perspective.

PSY 692 – M.S. “Plus Option” Clinical Practicum/Externship II

(3 credit hours)

This course is the second part of a two-part course sequence that also includes PSY 691. During these two courses students are placed in clinical practicum sites where they complete a nine-month practicum that provides for a minimum of 300 hours of supervised clinical practice. Students also attend regularly scheduled case consultation groups in which they discuss clinical practice from an integrated Catholic perspective.
(Prerequisite: PSY 691)

PSY 696 – Independent Study (Master’s Program)

(1-3 credit hours)

Individualized plan of study designed through agreement between the instructor and student, and approved by the Department Chairman. Such plans may include designated readings, viewing of videotaped learning resources, individual meetings for discussion with the instructor, research, and writing, as well as other types of assignments. The instructor determines in advance the requirements and criteria by which a grade is assigned and the number of credit hours to be awarded. Students are limited to a maximum combination of two independent study and psychology seminar courses per degree program.
(Prerequisite: Consent of Faculty Advisor and Department Chair)

PSY 697 – Psychology Seminar (Master’s Program)

(1-3 credit hours)

This seminar course offered to a group of students on a topic or topics specified by the instructor and approved by the Department Chair. The seminar format typically includes regularly scheduled class meetings in which the instructor gives lectures and/or facilitates discussion. Students are limited to a maximum combination of two independent study and psychology seminar courses per degree program.
(Prerequisite: Consent of Faculty Advisor and Department Chair.)

PSY 701 – Foundational Clinical Practicum/Externship I

(3 credit hours)

This course reflects time spent gaining clinical experience at the externship site. Students also attend and present at regularly scheduled case consultation groups which focus on skill development in the areas of diagnosis, treatment planning, clinical skills, and provision of services from an integrated perspective.
(Co-requisite: Placement in the IPS Psychology Clinic)

PSY 702 – Foundational Clinical Practicum/Externship II

(3 credit hours)

This course reflects time spent gaining clinical experience at the externship site. Students also attend and present at regularly scheduled case consultation groups which focus on skill development in the areas of diagnosis, treatment planning, clinical skills, and provision of services from an integrated perspective.
(Prerequisite: PSY 701)

PSY 718 – Research Design for the Psychological Sciences

(3 credit hours)

This course presents concepts related to experimental design: validity and reliability, unobtrusive, quasi-experimental and experimental research design, as well as small-n methodology. Philosophy of science as it relates to data analysis will be examined. Survey research topics are covered. Research ethics and the writing of research reports are also addressed.
(Prerequisite: PSY 504)

PSY 721 – Cognitive Psychology

(3 credit hours)

This is a survey course in modern cognitive psychology, including perception, attention, memory, knowledge, imagery, language, problem solving, reasoning, decision-making, and emotion and memory. Issues of emotion and memory, and the controversy over recovered/false memories is examined. Research concerning the cognitive science of religion is also surveyed.

PSY 724 – Advanced Adult Psychotherapy

(4 credit hours)

This is an advanced seminar on methods of individual psychotherapy, with a concentration on interpersonal psychotherapy. The instructor will draw from among the principles of interpersonal psychotherapy, object relations theory, attachment theory, cognitive therapy, family systems and others. A Catholic Anthropology will be integrated into the subject matter. Issues concerning culture, ethnicity, gender, religious values and other client characteristics will be addressed. The course will include didactic and experiential learning. Sessions from students’ clinical caseloads will be reviewed and critiqued. (Prerequisite: PSY 609)

PSY 729 – Advanced Statistical Methods

(3 credit hours)

This course builds on the basic concepts presented in PSY 718 to examine more advanced statistical analyses. These include factorial and multivariate analysis of variance, multiple and logistic regression, meta-analysis, and structural equation modeling. Primary emphasis in the class will be in understanding and critiquing the statistical analyses presented in clinical psychology journals as an adjunct to lifelong learning.
(Prerequisites: PSY 504, PSY 718)

PSY 734 – Advanced Child, Marital, and Family Therapy I

(3 credit hours)

PSY 734 (and its companion course PSY 735) promote mastery of basic knowledge and skills obtained in the earlier courses PSY 610 and PSY 611, as well as introducing advanced knowledge and training in the areas of child, marital, and family therapy. Methodologies and techniques covered in PSY 734 include play therapy, parenting skills training, family therapy with children, and marital therapy. The course also enhances students’ understanding and application of the ethical issues and diversity issues involved in the utilization of these therapeutic interventions. Throughout the course, connections are made to practicing these methodologies from an integrated Catholic perspective.
(Prerequisites: PSY 610, PSY 611)

PSY 735 – Advanced Child, Marital, and Family Therapy II

(3 credit hours)

PSY 735 continues the work of its companion course PSY 734 by providing advanced training in the areas of child, marital, and family therapy. Methodologies and techniques covered include advanced skills in working individually with children and parents, family therapy with adolescents, and specialized formats of marital therapy (e.g. individual spouse, brief intensive, and crisis intervention therapies). The course also enhances students’ understanding of and ability to apply the ethical issues and diversity issues involved in the utilization of these therapeutic interventions. Throughout the course, connections are made to practicing these methodologies from an integrated Catholic perspective.
(Prerequisite: PSY 734)

PSY 736 – Child Psychopathology

(2 credit hours)

This course provides a broad overview of child psychopathology initially focusing on understanding basic concepts, historical context, developmental influences, theoretical perspectives, research methodology, and issues related to assessment and classification. This will be followed by a comprehensive survey of the major categories of child psychopathological disturbances with an emphasis on empirically supported interventions for treating the various disorders.

PSY 743 – Trauma Treatment for Children and Adolescents

PSY 743 – Trauma Treatment for Children and Adolescents: Case Conceptualization and Practical Techniques (1 credit hour)

Often children and adolescents that have been traumatized are not able to identify, express or process their experience within the context of traditional verbal psychotherapy. This course will address the clinical considerations that are relevant in the treatment of children and adolescents that have been traumatized. The course will include a theoretical presentation of important factors to consider when dealing with victims of trauma as well as a practical component including the presentation and practice of relevant clinical techniques.

PSY 744 – Trauma Treatment for Adults

PSY 744 – Trauma Treatment for Adults: Case Conceptualization and Practical Techniques (1 credit hour)

This course will focus on the evaluation and treatment of adult trauma survivors. Special consideration will be given to recent controversies surrounding the recovery of memories of abuse and the false memory syndrome. This course will present general trauma treatment synthesizing the clients’ pre- trauma functioning, the traumatic event(s), the moderating influences, and the post-traumatic states. Ways to help clients transcend their traumatic past, and to envision and to fulfill their particular vocation in their state of life will be addressed.

PSY 748 – Diagnosis and Treatment of Substance Abuse Disorders

(3 credit hours)

This course will provide an overview of the fundamental concepts in substance abuse and substance-induced disorders. A review of the historical, geographic, economic, socio-cultural and genetic factors that impact substance misuse and abuse will be covered. Treatment options, different intervention approaches and strategies applicable to substance abuse intervention, as well as barriers to treatment, will also be included.

PSY 760 – Professional Roles and Issues

(2 credit hours)

This seminar examines the multiple career opportunities and professional roles of professional psychologists. Topics include academic careers, clinical practice in a variety of settings, scholarly publishing and presentations, and involvement in professional associations. In addition, students construct a curriculum vitae and develop a strategic career plan.

PSY 801 – Advanced Clinical Practicum/Externship I

(3 credit hours)

This course reflects time spent gaining clinical experience at the externship site. Students also attend and present at regularly scheduled case consultation groups which focus on sharing of the diversity of clinical experiences obtained through the variety of external site placements, with input from IPS faculty on how these experiences interface with the perspective of the Institute training model. (Corequisite: Placement in an IPS approved externship. Typically completed by students in their fourth year of the Psy.D. Program.
(Prerequisite: PSY 702)

PSY 802 – Advanced Clinical Practicum/Externship II

(3 credit hours)

Second of two required semesters of advanced clinical experience at the externship site (see Prerequisite: PSY 801 for additional details)

PSY 815 – Psychology of Religion

(3 credit hours)

This course will provide an overview of the empirical psychology of religion as well as more general social scientific perspectives on religion. Topics will include issues of measurement, faith development, religion in adolescence, its effects on health and at-risk behavior, religious coping styles, conversion, religious experience and mysticism, as well as the treatment of religion in attachment theory, evolutionary perspectives, the cognitive science of religion, and the spirituality and/or/versus religion debate. “New” religions, totalistic movements, and the “new atheism” will also be examined.

PSY 819 – Career Counseling and Development

PSY 819 – Career Counseling and Development: Theories and Techniques (3 credit hours)

This course provides an analysis of the basic theories of career development including the educational, psychological, and social factors which influence educational and vocational decision making. The use of vocational and educational assessment to advise as to school, work, and college planning is included.

PSY 820 – Group Psychotherapy

(3 credit hours)

This course will cover evidence-based therapeutic factors that operate in most group interventions and the role of these in long term, short term and specialty groups. It will include didactic and experiential learning, case presentations, seminar discussion and analysis of group research. The course will also illustrate how Catholic Anthropological principles might apply to group life.

PSY 822 – Biological Bases of Behavior

(3 credit hours)

This course serves as a general introduction for students to the field of physiological psychology, emphasizing a number of areas that are most useful in the practice of clinical psychology. These areas include the nervous system, behavioral genetics, and psychopharmacology.

PSY 825 – Social Psychology

(3 credit hours)

Serves as an overview of the major theories, areas of study, and research methodologies in the field of social psychology. Includes such topics as impression formation, attribution theory, social influence, attitude development and change, prejudice and discrimination, antisocial and prosocial behaviors, affiliation and attraction, and sex role behaviors. Behaviors strongly intertwined with affect such as aggression, prejudice, and interpersonal attraction and intimate relations, as well as contemporary theories of affective influences are examined.

PSY 827 – Cultural, Religious, and Individual Diversity in Clinical Practice

(3 credit hours)

This course systematically covers the cultural, religious, and individual diversity considerations central to effective functioning of a clinical psychologist. In addition to reviewing the adjustments in clinical practice expected when working with individuals from diverse backgrounds, attention is given to the need which often arises to coordinate treatment efforts with other professionals who are involved in caring for the client.

PSY 830 – The Psychologist as Consultant, Supervisor and Educator

(3 credit hours)

As leaders, psychologists find themselves called to participate in many roles beyond those of clinical practice and research. This course introduces students to the leadership roles of consultation, supervision, and teaching. Students will be introduced to the literature concerning these areas, as well as being provided with opportunities for experiential learning about these roles.

PSY 832 – Integrative Dissertation Seminar

(3 credit hours)

This seminar is the final integration course in the Psy.D. curriculum. Its purpose is to review, refine, and further develop the students’ understanding of psychology from an integrated perspective. The seminar also serves to assist students in adopting an integrated approach to the completion of their doctoral dissertation.

PSY 836 – Advanced Personality Assessment

(4 credit hours)

This course develops skills in the administration and interpretation of more advanced projective personality techniques such as the Rorschach. Report writing skills are developed further by examining the ways in which the results of a variety of psychological assessment instruments can be integrated and used to make diagnoses and treatment recommendations.
(Prerequisite: PSY 613)

PSY 896 – Independent Study (PsyD. Program)

(1-3 credit hours)

Individualized plan of study designed through agreement between the instructor and student, and approved by the Department Chair. Such plans may include designated readings, viewing of videotaped learning resources, individual meetings for discussion with the instructor, research, and writing, as well as other types of assignments. The instructor determines in advance the requirements and criteria by which a grade is assigned and the number of credit hours to be awarded. Students are limited to a maximum combination of two Independent Study and Psychology Seminar courses per degree program.
(Prerequisite: Consent of Faculty Advisor and Department Chair)

PSY 897 – Psychology Seminar

(1-3 credit hours)

This seminar course is offered to a group of students on a topic or topics specified by the instructor and approved by the Department Chair. The seminar format typically includes regularly held class meetings in which the instructor gives lectures and/or facilitates discussion. Students are limited to a maximum combination of two Independent Study and Psychology Seminar courses per degree program.
(Prerequisite: Consent of Faculty Advisor and Department Chair)

PSY 899 – Dissertation

(1-3 credit hours per semester)

Registration for dissertation hours is required for all Psy.D. students from the time the Dissertation Chair is appointed until their dissertation is defended.

PHT 502 – Philosophical & Theological Anthropology

(4 credit hours)

This course examines the unity and complexity of the human person from a philosophical and theological perspective, with special attention to the Catholic tradition. It constitutes an introduction to classical philosophical psychology. The course promotes integrative competencies for adjudicating anthropological models and their treatment of: the human person and flourishing; moral agency and character; and the interaction of human nature, culture, and divine grace, while attending to relevance for psychotherapy. Together with the other integrative anthropological courses offered at the IPS, it provides an introduction to the most important philosophical and theological texts that are pertinent to the practice of clinical psychology.

PHT 507 – The Catholic/Christian Vision of the Person

This course explores the Catholic/Christian vision of the human person, and its application to psychology, service-delivery, and everyday living. It uses the holistic approach of the IPS Model of Integration, which combines Biblical/theological, philosophical, and psychological perspectives into a global understanding of the human person and flourishing. The course addresses the theory and implications of: the human person’s dignity in the light of being created in the image of God as male and female; the effects of sin and redeeming grace; a personalist and natural law approach; the person as a unity of body and soul that is relational, emotional, rational, and free.

PHT 508 – The Catholic/Christian Vision of Flourishing: Vocations and Virtues

The vision of human flourishing that one adopts is crucial for understanding and concretely addressing human problems. This course develops the Catholic/Christian vision of human flourishing in terms of vocations, virtues, and other spiritual resources. First, students learn about three levels of vocation: (1) a call to goodness and holiness; (2) a call to being single, married, ordained or religious (consecrated); and (3) a call to work and to service to one’s neighbors. Emphasis is placed on courtship and on marriage, which is understood as a natural and divine institution that serves to support and protect individuals, families, and society. Second, students explore the rich teaching on achieving personal growth and freedom through building up their practical reasoning, moral character, and spiritual life of faith, hope, and charity, which have an impact on everyday life and the helping professions. Lastly, students examine how Catholic/Christian practices, involving personal prayer, the Bible, and the Sacraments, and even sacrificial suffering can be sources of growth and healing.

PHT 535 – The Catholic Vision of Spiritual Maturity

(2 credit hours)

This course examines the structure, dynamics, and mechanisms for spiritual progress as understood in the Catholic tradition. Students will become familiar with the major spiritual writers in the Catholic tradition, and also explore the similarities and differences between a Christ-centered spirituality and select schools of thought.

PHT 614 – Practical Reasoning and Moral Character

(3 credit hours)

This course examines practical reasoning, moral character, and the virtues, in a philosophical and theological perspective, with special attention to the Catholic tradition and clinical psychology. Together with the other integrative anthropological courses offered at the IPS, it provides an introduction to the most important philosophical and theological texts that are pertinent to the practice of clinical psychology.

PHT 633 – Major World Philosophies and Religions

(3 credit hours)

This course introduces students to the dominant philosophical and religious worldviews of men and women in the 21st century. It does not presume such worldviews are in all cases explicitly espoused, though they often are. It does presume that the cognitions and behaviors of clients are shaped by conceptions of reality: about the nature of what is real, about the self and the human person, about human values, about life, death and afterlife. The course will consider in the case of each worldview its cosmology and metaphysics (e.g., whether the material universe is created, eternal, illusory); its anthropology, particularly its articulation and assessment of the program of evil ( e.g., of human limitation, disorder, suffering and death); its ethic (specifically its answer to (solution to) the problem of evil); its epistemology (e.g., whether it is realist, idealist, esotericist, its theory of knowing); and its eschatology (i.e., its view on the “four last things”-death, judgment, heaven and hell). Other diversity considerations will include gender diversity, sexual diversity, and racial diversity.

PHT 635 – Theology of Marriage and Family

(3 credit hours)

This course will introduce the student to the nature, origins, and purposes of marriage and family life. It will examine the continuity and development of Catholic teaching on marriage and family. It will also put this doctrine in a historical, psychological, philosophical, and theological context. It will address several issues that are especially pertinent to the psychological sciences, including disorders and privations related to romance, marriage, and family life. Together with the other integrative anthropological courses offered at the IPS, it provides an introduction to the most important philosophical and theological texts that are pertinent to the practice of clinical psychology.

PSY-PHL 648 – Ethics, Philosophy and Public Affairs

(2 credit hours)

The purpose of this course is to explore the relation between ethics, philosophy and public affairs both from the point of view of understanding the possibilities and limitations of practical, ethical and other philosophical considerations. The course will begin with three lectures setting out the history, concepts, methods, and primary areas of application of philosophy to public affairs. Thereafter, each session will focus on one of the readings identified with two students being assigned to lead each discussion.

LIB 500 – Library and Information Use & Research

(0 credit hours)

This course is required for all entering students and provides an in-depth review of library organization, collections, services, and online resources; presents the methodologies of information searching, strategy development, and evaluation; and reviews the evaluation of information and information sources.